Recent famous/large TBI and Head Injury cases

Many famous people have suffered from head injuries. US Consumer Product Safety Commission statistics indicate that more than one million people were treated at emergency rooms for head injuries.  The probable number of head injuries is greater, because many people are treated at other locations or do not recognize that they have received an injury.

United States Congressman from California, and former entertainer Sonny Bono, died of massive head injuries incurred while skiing.

James Brady (Ronald Reagan’s White House Press Secretary), suffered brain damage during an assassination attempt on then president Ronald Reagan. His battle to regain physical function (he is permanently disabled) focused national attention on brain injury rehabilitation.

Michael Kennedy, son of Robert Kennedy, suffered and died from a brain injury while skiing.

Two ABC journalists Bob Woodruff and cameraman Doug Vogt incurred traumatic brain injuries (TBI) when Iraqi insurgents detonated an improvised explosive device near the tank they were reporting from.   The war in Iraq  has seen the advent of the IED’s as a signature battle strategy.  The result of this is an estimated 20% of deployed soldiers experiencing concussions which can lead to TBI or delayed onset TBI.

As you can see head injuries affect all demographic groups and every age category.  If you are wrongly effected by a Washington DC brain injury, you should contact an attorney.

Even Princess Diana of England was involved in an auto accident in Paris and died shortly afterward of brain injuries.

The reality of traumatic brain injury impacts survivors and victims and their families.  The Brain Injury Association and many other foundations are available to assist you in learning about the newest advances in medicine, science and rehabilitation techniques to allow survivors to regain as much of their lives as possible.

This article was provided courtesy of the Washington DC brain injury lawyer, Anastopoulo & Clore, 800-610-2546.

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